Kintyre without Macartney

Taste Review # 13 – Glen Scotia 15

Glen Scotia 15

When I first started the idea of Scotty’s Drams, it was initially to do something a little more positive on the internet. The UK was getting smothered with news on Brexit, and this had spilled onto Facebook, and it was a bit depressing. It could turn you to drink, and in my case it has! The other thing was, that despite being a long time whisky drinker, and a collector since 2006, I thought it was my turn to add to the masses of other people writing a blog on whisky. If nothing else, it would push me out of my comfort zone and get me to try different things.

So for this taste test, I am trying something new – a Campbeltown whisky that isn’t Springbank. This one is one of only three distilleries left on the Kintyre peninsula, the others being Springbank and Glengyle (which releases whisky under the Kilkerran brand to avoid confusion with Glengyle blended malt). There’s thankfully nothing to reference Paul Macartney’s 1977 Christmas No.1 hit “Mull of Kintyre”, although he has owned High Park Farm there since 1966.

Glen Scotia is available in 2 NAS bottlings (double cask and Victoriana) plus 15, 18, 25 y.o expressions. Victoriana is made to represent the whisky that was being made at Glen Scotia during that period.

Was not sure what to expect, but this was a nice whisky, and here is what I found.

The nip and bottle

Region

Campbeltown

Age

15 y.o

Strength

46% a.b.v

Colour

Deep Golden / light copper

Nose

Brine, hint of smoke, burnt caramel, sweetness, ginger biscuits.

Palate

Vanilla, no real spirit burn. On first sip opens out to sweetness, possibly the influence of a sherry cask. Hues of Apricot. Wood, but not necessarily oak. Lemongrass.

Finish

Dry and robust. medium to long.

Conclusion

Yes. Not bad as 15 year old whiskies go. I’d not call it my favourite, but well worth a further look. I’m a big fan of ginger, and the tingle of spice was a bonus for me. The use of bourbon cask has given great vanilla notes, and the use of a sherry cask for the last two months of maturation has given a subtle sweetness.

However, you might experience something different. I’d certainly consider putting this in my drinking collection.

Slainte Mhath!

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